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13 comments

  1. December 19, 2014
    Heather @ new house new home

    I’m BACK!! So, for the kerria they are talking about how to divide it for propagation (getting more plants). Which I don’t think you want to do – lol. So I’m sticking with my original advise – cut the entire thing back in the spring before it gets leaves. Right back to about 2-4″ (6″ at most). The bush will recuperate and be a lot healthier in the long run. Every year after it reaches your desired height (I don’t think you want it much bigger than 4′-6′ tall), prune out any older branches. The reason that it’s so unruly is that they tried to prune it into a ball (which is against it’s natural growing state) and it branches out from the top with long strands that you see hanging down. Pruning for shape with these plants is not really recommended.
    As for the “green stuff” – its moss/lichen growing. Beautiful where you want it, not so much on fences. It’s probably pretty damp and dark where it’s growing. Power wash it off. But it can return – I suggest scrubbing with a mild soap/water solution and if it’s really stubborn, throw in some bleach (no more than 10%).
    Hope that helps!!

    Reply
    • December 20, 2014
      Tara

      Heather! Hooray! You’re back!

      And… okay. You want me to make it only 4″ tall!?!?

      That is crazy scary to me. This thing is gigantic! I’m going to have to bring out the big guns….

      But I trust you. Jabba is all kinds of ugly right now, and I don’t love the look he has going.

      I’ll break out the power washer for the fence. The trouble is, our fence is on its last days. There is some serious dampness and darkness happening on the bottom 10″ of the fence. I think that there used to be some raised garden beds against the fence boards…

      Friend, what can you tell me about the wisteria? Should I be hacking that back too?

      Reply
      • December 21, 2014
        Heather @ new house new home

        As for Jabba – you’re going to cut it back (in the spring) to about 6″ – every single bit of it gone!! Then it can regrow with fresh wood which will bloom more and show the true shape of the plant. I’m only recommending that it will probably grow no more than 4-6″ that first year or so.
        As for the wisteria – I’m no expert. So I don’t want to steer you wrong.

        Reply
        • December 21, 2014
          Tara

          Heather, I want you to start a blog called “Ask Heather” and all of us plant-ignorant folk will just pepper you with questions, and you can answer them.

          That would be really helpful for my backyard dilemmas! 😉

          Okay – I’m feeling excited about giving Jabba the ultimate haircut. I think you’re so right when you say that he was inappropriately pruned into a ball. When you look past his “bangs”, there is a heap of empty wood in there – no leaves… just a thicket, almost.

          I’m going to have to do some wisteria research. It’s daunting… the trunk(s) are SO thick!

          Thank you SO much for your advice! I love it!

          Reply
  2. December 20, 2014
    Laurie@ Vin’yet Etc.

    Jabba is terrifying! I don’t know plants that well, when we moved here the previous owners bought out a greenhouse (I’m sure they did) and there were soooo many we just ripped a bunch out and started over. Really, I can’t tell the difference between weeds and some plants. Lucy is such a great helper, you should get her a little bird book for her stocking this year, so cute!

    PS apparently cutting the hosta’s blooms encourages a fuller plant, but really I have no clue and I leave them too.

    Reply
    • December 21, 2014
      Heather @ new house new home

      Hi Laurie
      You’re right about the hosta blooms – cutting them off before they bloom means that all the nutrients will go into the leaves – hence a healthier plant. I always cut mine off because I don’t like the look of the blooms – I grow hosts for their foliage.

      Reply
      • December 21, 2014
        Tara

        That’s my mother’s reasoning, too. She doesn’t like the blooms.

        I kind of like them – though fuller foliage on the hosta is an appealing idea…

        Reply
  3. December 22, 2014
    Bonnie @ Uncommon Designs

    Ryobi has the best tools!

    Reply
    • January 1, 2015
      Tara

      I totally agree, Bonnie! 🙂

      Reply
  4. December 22, 2014
    La Cuisine d’Helene

    Oh my she is such a cutie, must be fun to work on your backyard with her. Sounds like a great trimmer to buy, my son usually does it for me. It’s nice to have help with the outside work.

    Reply
    • January 1, 2015
      Tara

      My kids are almost TOO eager to help. But it’s really nice to have them do work like blow the leaves off of the patio or pick up stray twigs, etc. I did a lot of yard work as a young’n and I think that I learned a lot (even though I probably moaned far too often than necessary).

      Reply
  5. December 22, 2014
    Mary Beth|Cupcakes and Crinoline

    I don’t have any Ryobi tools but I’m always eyeing them up when I go to the home stores ~ they look amazing!

    Reply
    • January 1, 2015
      Tara

      Oh, we love that our batteries are interchangeable with our Ryobi set. It means that we always have a fresh battery waiting for one of our tools. If you need to get some new gear, I highly recommend them! 🙂

      Reply

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